What am I worth to you?

Folks are split on when artists deserve to be paid. Photo from Images_of_Money on Flickr.

Earlier this year, the New York Times reported on the controversy over the Upright Citizens Brigade (UCB) Theatre’s policy of not paying its performers. UCB is almost universally considered the leading improv theater in New York, and attracts much of the top talent. It’s not a small side project, or an isolated community; it shapesRead More

Around the horn: cease fire edition

ART AND THE GOVERNMENT “Kansas arts agencies have been on hold several months, waiting for a clue as to how state dollars allocated by the 2012 Legislature might translate into an economic boon to arts programs.” The recent public arts funding update had some grim news from the UK. Here’s one possible reason: an annual studyRead More

Around the horn: poolside edition

ART AND THE GOVERNMENT Americans for the Arts hosted a blog salon last month on the Common Core State Standards (“the next big thing in education”) and what they mean for arts education. I particularly enjoyed former colleague Richard Kessler’s “Steal This Blog” entry. Quite interesting analysis from Barry Hessenius of possible future directions for local arts agencies.Read More

Audiences at the Gate published in Grantmakers in the Arts Reader (and why it’s still relevant)

Readers who have been with us for a while will recall that in 2010, Daniel Reid and I wrote an article for Edward P. Clapp’s 20UNDER40 anthology called Audiences at the Gate: Reinventing Arts Philanthropy Through Guided Crowdsourcing. The article contends that traditional models of philanthropy, in which a single program officer or a handfulRead More

TEDx Talk

[slideshare id=7972366&doc=tedxpresentation-flatversion-110515131309-phpapp02] [Remarks as prepared for TEDxMichiganAve at the Chicago Symphony Center's Club 8, May 7, 2011.] “Never Heard of ‘Em”: Why Citizen Curators (not Daddy’s Money) Should Decide Who Gets to Be an Artist For the past few months, you’ve probably been besieged with emails and Facebook posts asking you to convince our politiciansRead More

Supply is Not Going to Decrease (So It’s Time to Think About Curating)

Image by Flickr user Waddell and Condor

(Cross-posted from the NEA’s Art Works blog. The version that appears there was edited for length; this is the original.) I’ve been waiting for a while to respond to the controversy that erupted after Rocco Landesman’s comments on supply and demand in the arts at Arena Stage in January. (Createquity’s previous coverage, provided by AaronRead More

Audiences at the Gate: Reinventing Arts Philanthropy Through Guided Crowdsourcing

Program theory v2

(This article originally appeared in 20UNDER40 anthologyi edited by Edward P. Clapp, and has been republished with permission.) Spurred on by major technological advances, the number of aspiring professional artists in the United States has reached unprecedented levels and will only continue to grow. The arts’ current system of philanthropic support is woefully underequipped to evaluate thisRead More

Attendance is not the only measure of demand

If you’ve followed theater blogs even casually over the past week, you will have heard about NEA Chair Rocco Landesman’s comments on oversupply of performing arts in his address to the #newplay convening at Arena Stage in Washington DC. Trisha Mead is a Portland arts marketer who broke the story, got quoted (sloppily, without context) in the NewRead More