Cool jobs of the month

A plentiful bounty this month! Multiple positions, National Endowment for the Arts Literature Director (GS-0301-14/15) Literature and Arts Education Division Salary Range: $106,263.00 to $157,100.00 / Per Year Excepted Service Not to Exceed 2 Years Media Arts Director (GS-0301-14/15) Visual Arts Division Salary Range: $106,263.00 to $157,100.00 / Per Year Excepted Service Not to ExceedRead More

Around the horn: Crimea edition

ART AND THE GOVERNMENT And, we try again: as expected, the FCC is proposing new net neutrality rules. They are similar to the previous rules, which were recently invalidated by a federal court, but depend on a different legal rationale. Those who are concerned the rules (old and new) do not go far enough toRead More

The Top 10 Arts Policy Stories of 2013

The Thinker at the Detroit Institute of Arts - photo by Quick fix

Each year, Createquity offers a list of the top ten arts policy stories of the past twelve months. You can read the previous editions here: 2012, 2011, 2010, and 2009. The list, like the blog, is focused on the United States, but is not oblivious to news from other parts of the world. I amRead More

Around the horn: healthcare.gov edition

ART AND THE GOVERNMENT A consortium of City of Detroit creditors have made the first legal move towards pressuring the Detroit Institute of Arts to sell city-owned artworks to help pay for debts owed. Executive Vice President Annemarie Erickson defends the museum against Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr’s demand that the museum find one way orRead More

Around the horn: Sweet Caroline edition

ART AND THE GOVERNMENT The New York Times reports on the state of Rhode Island’s disastrous investment in former Boston Red Sox star pitcher Curt Schilling’s video game company, 38 Studios. Little Rhody gave Schilling a $75 million loan as an incentive to locate in the Ocean State, as part of a new Knowledge District in downtownRead More

Around the horn: Pesach edition

AR T AND THE GOVERNMENT One artist’s activism on immigration and visa reform (he’s banned from entering the USA for 10 years because of a paperwork snafu). The Obama administration has announced three new members of the National Council on the Arts, the body that oversees the NEA. Here are interviews with Maria Rosario Jackson, Emil Kang and Paul Hodes.Read More

Making History While Making Places – Creativity From the Ground Up

Mural in Paducah, KY. Photo by Tom Borrup

(Tom Borrup was kind enough to send this reaction to the recent ArtPlace Creative Placemaking Summit. Tom consults with cities, foundations, and nonprofits integrating the arts, economic development, urban planning, civic engagement, and animation of public space. His book The Creative Community Builders’ Handbook, 2006, profiles communities that have transformed their economic, social, and physical infrastructuresRead More

Solving the Underpants Gnomes Problem: Towards an Evidence-Based Arts Policy

That’s the title of a talk I presented via the University of Chicago’s Cultural Policy Center on November 14, 2012. It’s long, but I think it’s one of the more significant things I’ve done recently and hope you’ll check it out if you have some time. The actual lecture portion of the talk occupies the firstRead More

America’s Top ArtPlaces

Carol Coletta of ArtPlace and Mayor Tom Barrett recognize the Third Ward as one of America’s Top ArtPlaces 2013.

ArtPlace has released a report on the “top 12 ArtPlaces” in the country – the neighborhoods or clusters that scored highest on a subset of the funder’s much-discussed vibrancy indicators: number of “indicator” businesses (“eating and drinking places, shops, personal service establishments and other businesses that cater to consumers”), percentage of independently owned businesses, walkability, percentage of workersRead More

The Top 10 Arts Policy Stories of 2012

From Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History's Family Fallapalooza

Each year, Createquity offers a list of the top ten arts policy stories of the past 12 months. You can read the previous editions here: 2009, 2010, and 2011.  The list, like the blog, is focused on the United States, but is not oblivious to news from other parts of the world. This year, forRead More